louisiana spca laspca spca hurricane katrina disaster katrina animalrescue stories

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Follow Our Lead louisiana spca laspca spca hurricane katrina disaster

Rebuilding

When the Louisiana SPCA lost the Japonica Street shelter in the massive flooding following Hurricane Katrina, it lost more than just a building. It lost a place where a community could bring homeless and stray animals that would otherwise face a dire and dangerous existence on the streets. It lost a place where residents could seek low-cost medical treatment for their animals when they couldn’t afford to do so anywhere else. It lost a place where a committed staff and selfless volunteers would work tirelessly to find new homes for animals that so desperately needed a second, third and as many chances as possible to find a loving family.


In a community where animal overpopulation has always tipped the scales, imagine what it would be like if there wasn’t a shelter where all animals are accepted regardless of breed, age, health or temperament. More importantly, imagine what the pet overpopulation would look like without the only high-volume spay/neuter clinic in the region.  


The Louisiana SPCA experienced a devastating loss but possessed a dogged determination to rebuild. The groundbreaking of the new facility in Algiers, Louisiana in 2007 signaled not only a rebirth but a desire to move beyond the tragedy in order to re-establish the most comprehensive animal care services in the state. In the past 10 years, we’ve come so far but there is still much work to be done. The expansion of the Adoption, Resource Center & Clinic is just one example of our commitment to the animals in our community! Click here to learn more about the Grand Opening August 21-23.


“Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the Louisiana SPCA is celebrating our community’s resilience with the opening of our new facility.  The expansion of our campus provides new adoption rooms, classrooms, and a veterinary clinic.  It’s a reflection of the community’s commitment to the lives of animals and the enduring human-animal bond which played such an important role in our community’s recovery,” says Louisiana SPCA CEO Ana Zorrilla. “To be a part of the tapestry of our community’s resilience and growth ten years later is something we are extremely proud of.” 

 

 

Dorothy Dorsett Brown Campus

 

Dorothy Dorsett Brown Campus

 

The new Dorothy Dorsett Brown campus was purchased as a direct result of the former location on Japonica Street in the Ninth Ward being destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. The campus is 10.7 acres.

Animal Rescue and Care Center

Adoption, Resource Center and Clinic

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